Political Art

A first generation child in the U.S., Yessica Jimenez (Xeroine) is a visual artist.

Yessica followed after her sister when it came to art. Her sister used to draw a lot throughout high school, but didn't stick with it. Ever since Yessica started drawing around the age of four or five, she hasn't stopped.

"I've been working more, creating more and selling more."

She goes to different festivals and sets up shop to sell her visual art--the most she's made off one singular piece is $300.

"I get attached," she said. "I'm really bad at pricing myself."

Yessica likes selling prints of her work because "they're easier to take home," but in reality it's too hard for her to let go of her original work.

Her favorite piece she's done so far is titled "Hoes Praying for Justice" because it symbolizes finding spirituality while being "woke."

"I do self portraits without being conscious of it."

Yessica's artwork has turned political, especially during the time of the 2016 election. She starts off with an issue and by the time she's done, her art is a reflection of how she dealt/dealing with that issue.

The day before the election last year, Yessica released a portrait of Adolf Hitler with Donald Trump's toupee. In the thought bubble it said, "I've always wanted to be blonde." She wanted to portray Trump as the new Hitler.

Since her family is from Mexico, Yessica would love to paint for someone who lives there. Her family's birthplace means a lot to her, which is why she fights so hard for immigrants, people of color, and anyone who gets mistreated by "the man."

"I don't want people to feel hopeless."

Yessica loves making art for people, she's even had a dream of making her favorite band: My Chemical Romance, cover art for their album, but they are no longer a group.

"My dreams were shattered when they broke up."

She's surrounded by art no matter where she goes. Yessica is either creating her own art, admiring others or at work at the Milwaukee Art Museum. 

"It's cool to make something you can share with people," said Yessica. "It's exciting to see people see it."

From self portraits to political issues, Yessica's art is making a way for the underdog.